Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History

  1. Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History Timeline
  2. Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History War
  3. Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History Channel

The Mexican-American War of 1846, marked a major advancement in the role the media had on the war. With the creation of the telegraph reporters were able to receive information at a faster rate. The United States public received information about the war at a faster speed because of the telegraph and United States printers established “occupation newspapers” in Mexico. There were many advancements that the media made during the war. The press combined all their resources to create the express system that would get the most up to date information in the fastest time. They combined “pony express, steamships, railroads, and the fledgling telegraph, the press established a two-thousand mile communications link that repeatedly beat military couriers and the U.S. mail with the Mexico news.” James Gordon Bennett of the New York Herald, says the express system used by penny press leaders is a creature of modern times. It is interesting how this system still exists today and how it has improved with the creation of the internet.

MexicanStart of the mexican american warhistoriographymacWarhistoriographymac

However, given that Mexico is one of our two closest neighbors, that Mexican Americans are by far the largest group of Latinx people living in the U.S. (nearly 37 million as of 2018), and that 2021 marks 200 years since the end of the Mexican War of Independence (1810–1821), it never hurts to learn a little more with Mexican history books!

Start

Source:

Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History Timeline

War

Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History War

Photo:

Start Of The Mexican American Warhistoriographymac's History Channel

  1. The history of Mexican Americans, or American residents of Mexican descent, largely begins after the annexation of Northern Mexico in 1848, when the nearly 80,000 Mexican citizens of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico became U.S. Large-scale migration increased the U.S.’ Mexican population during the 1910s, as refugees fled the economic devastation and violence of Mexico’s high-casualty revolution and civil war.
  2. But in the last half of the 20th century, Mexican-inspired foods found their way to every corner of the country, merging into the mainstream. Alongside traditional foods like tortillas, tacos, tamales, enchiladas, and salsas, new dishes emerged that reflected a blending of Mexican, regional American, and other Latino cultures.
  3. Nevertheless, the Mexican-American War had far-reaching consequences for both the United States, Mexico, and the Indigenous peoples whose land both nations claimed. First among these was the cession of about one third of Mexico’s territory to the United States, a landmass of over 338,000,000 acres.