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Games home Spider Solitaire. Contact Arkadium, the provider of these games. Spider Solitaire players also enjoy: See More Games. Spider: The Video Game received favorable reviews according to the review aggregation website GameRankings. In Japan, however, where the game was ported for release on May 23, 1997, Famitsu gave it a score of 24 out of 40. The most common subject of praise was the use of real spider abilities to crawl on any surface and lower oneself on a thread. Adventure - Spiter Games - Home. Play Spider Solitaire instantly online. Spider Solitaire is a fun and engaging Online game from Evening Standard. Play it and other games from The Evening Standard.

Spider: The Video Game
Developer(s)Boss Game Studios
Publisher(s)BMG Interactive
Composer(s)Barry Leitch
Platform(s)PlayStation
Release
Genre(s)Platform
Mode(s)Single-player

Spider: The Video Game, also known as simply Spider, is a 2.5Dplatformingvideo game developed by Boss Game Studios[1] and published by BMG Interactive exclusively on PlayStation.

The player takes the role of a cybernetic spider, within which the mind of its creator, Dr. Michael Kelly, has been implanted.[2]

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Gameplay[edit]

The player must navigate 3D-drawn environments in a strictly 2D manner, traveling to the end of each level using typical platforming game mechanics.[3] The player can use the spider's natural abilities, such as climbing walls and ceilings and using silk to lower itself, in order to overcome certain obstacles.[3] He can also equip up to four of the ten different cybernetic leg attachments found throughout the game, which are used as weapons.[4] When the player loses a life, all the acquired cybernetic attachments are lost except for the default slasher attachment.[4] The obstacles include lab sinks, acid, test tubes and primarily other cybernetic creatures as enemies. After escaping the laboratory, the player goes to a factory, a museum, and various other locales, each infested with strange and malevolent creatures.[4]

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Development[edit]

According to Boss Game Studios creative director Seth Mendelsohn, they used 2D gameplay for Spider because 'We wanted to do a game that plays more like the traditional platform game, because they're fun to play. In full-form 3-D, you can't make a game that plays like a traditional platform game. There are issues about jumping and judging distance.'[5]

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The team opted to make just three bosses for the game so they could give each one more focus, creating more animations and different behaviors for each one.[5]

Reception[edit]

Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
GameRankings78%[6]
Review scores
PublicationScore
AllGame[7]
Edge5/10[8]
EGM7.375/10[9]
Famitsu24/40[10]
Game Informer5.5/10[11]
GameFan79%[12][a]
GamePro[13][b]
GameRevolutionB[14]
GameSpot7.6/10[15]
IGN6/10[16]
Next Generation[17]
OPM (UK)7/10[18]

Spider: The Video Game received favorable reviews according to the review aggregation website GameRankings.[6] In Japan, however, where the game was ported for release on May 23, 1997, Famitsu gave it a score of 24 out of 40.[10]

The most common subject of praise was the use of real spider abilities to crawl on any surface and lower oneself on a thread.[9][13][15][17] Whether or not a critic recommended the game largely hinged on their opinion of the format of 2D gameplay in a 3D environment. As with Pandemonium!, which shares this format, Dan Hsu of Electronic Gaming Monthly dismissed Spider as a game with good graphics but mediocre gameplay, while his three co-reviewers praised it for its good control and sprawling, non-linear levels, though they complained that the camera occasionally causes problems.[9] A Next Generation critic, while noting that the graphics are good and the gameplay has some unique elements, maintained that the 2D nature of the gameplay makes it overly familiar.[17] Ryan MacDonald of GameSpot judged it to be a highly enjoyable platformer, and particularly commended how well the spider perspective is handled.[15]GamePro's Scary Larry praised the impressive cinematics, unobtrusive music, and long, non-linear levels, and concluded, 'You'll need all your spider powers for this game, which can be frustrating (especially when precise leaping is required), but in the end you'll find it's worth it.'[13]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Three critics of GameFan gave the game each a score of 80, 79, and 78.
  2. ^GamePro gave the game three 4.5/5 scores for graphics, sound, and overall fun factor and 4/5 for control.
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References[edit]

  1. ^'E3: Spider'. GamePro. No. 95. IDG. August 1996. p. 40.
  2. ^EGM staff (January 1997). 'Protos: Spider'(PDF). Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 90. Ziff Davis. p. 38.
  3. ^ ab'NG Alphas: Spider'. Next Generation. No. 24. Imagine Media. December 1996. p. 141.
  4. ^ abcEGM staff (February 1997). 'Spider: This Itsy-Bitsy Hero Ain't Cute'. Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 91. Ziff Davis. pp. 122–26.
  5. ^ abEGM staff (February 1997). 'Behind the Screens'. Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 91. Ziff Davis. p. 123.
  6. ^ ab'Spider: The Video Game for PlayStation'. GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  7. ^Alan Weiss, Brett. 'Spider: The Video Game'. Archived from the original on November 16, 2014. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  8. ^Edge staff (May 1997). 'Spider [The Video Game]'. Edge. No. 45. Future Publishing. p. 94. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  9. ^ abcEGM staff (March 1997). 'Spider [The Video Game]'. Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 92. Ziff Davis. p. 50.
  10. ^ ab'スパイダー [PS]'. Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  11. ^Anderson, Paul; Reiner, Andrew; Storm, Jon (March 1997). 'Spider'. Game Informer. No. 47. FuncoLand. Archived from the original on October 21, 1997. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  12. ^Halverson, Dave 'E. Storm'; Jevons, Dan 'Knightmare'; Hobbs, Michael 'Substance D' (March 1997). 'Spider'. GameFan. Vol. 5 no. 3. Metropolis Media. p. 26. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  13. ^ abcScary Larry (March 1997). 'Spider'. GamePro. No. 102. IDG. p. 68.
  14. ^Dr. Moo (March 1997). 'Spider Review'. GameRevolution. CraveOnline. Archived from the original on June 6, 1997. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  15. ^ abcMacDonald, Ryan (March 11, 1997). 'Spider: The Video Game Review'. GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  16. ^IGN staff (February 14, 1997). 'Spider'. IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  17. ^ abc'Spider'. Next Generation. No. 28. Imagine Media. April 1997. pp. 120, 122. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  18. ^OPMUK staff (June 1997). 'Spider'. Official UK PlayStation Magazine. No. 20. Future Publishing. p. 111. Retrieved December 28, 2020.

External links[edit]

Spider Games Homecoming

  • Spider: The Video Game at MobyGames

Spider Games Homemade

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